Dual screen articulating display coming soon with touchscreen option

Mobile Pixels Inc is a company that likes to offer its customers multiple screen options. He has already produced a wide range (opens in a new tab) extended and additional screen products for laptop users, adding an extra screen, or two, or even more – to help increase the productivity of mobile workers.

Now it has focused on innovation for the desktop, with the Geminos family of displays; the Geminos and Geminos X. These are large folding screens with a clamshell fixed on an adjustable stand with an integrated hub. Product designers claim that using a Geminos can “save your neck and desk space”, and its fit and articulation are great for all sorts of productivity tasks.

Geminos Articulating Dual Screen Display

(Image credit: Mobile Pixels Inc)

The Geminos stacked screen Kickstarter project was a resounding success on the crowdfunding platform, becoming fully funded in just 36 minutes. This weekend, the developers at Geminos announced ambitious goals for the crowdfunder, perhaps hoping to give it another boost. The project started with a goal of $25,000 and currently has over $1.6 million in support, about halfway through the campaign. If the project hits $1.75 million (it will in 18 days), buyers will get a 10-point touchscreen option ($50 more) on the Geminos-X model equipped with a QHD screen.

The potential appeal of Geminos monitors is easy to understand – but what about the specs? We’ve got some more important details for you to flesh out the basics, and one of the first things to consider is that there are two Geminos models. Although they have a lot in common, there is a big difference between Geminos and Geminos X; the former has two 24-inch FHD displays, and the latter uses QHD displays. As a display product, it’s important that we take a close look at the specs of the display, not just the foldable ‘gimmicky’, so we’ve compiled the main monitor specs below.

Gemini

Gemini X

Screens

2x 24 inch

2x 24 inch

Screen technology

IPS, LED backlight

IPS, LED backlight

Display resolution

1080p for 97ppi

1440p for 123ppi

Brightness

250nits

300nits

Contrast

1000:1

1000:1

Color

6-bit, 97% sRGB

6-bit, 99% sRGB

Refresh rate

60Hz

75Hz

Response time

14 milliseconds

14ms

Other Features

1080p webcam, speakers and 100W USB-C PD docking station with HDMI, USB, SD/CF card, Ethernet, audio and more

1080p webcam, speakers and 100W USB-C PD docking station with HDMI, USB, SD/CF card, Ethernet, audio and more

Physical

20 lbs, 4 inches thick, pedestal adjustment bracket

20 lbs, 4 inches thick, pedestal adjustment bracket

Geminos Articulating Dual Screen Display

(Image credit: Mobile Pixels Inc)

Above you can see that the QHD model is a bit better than the FHD model in several ways not directly responsible for resolution; maximum brightness, color gamut, and maximum refresh rate. Plus, there’s a claimed 13ms response time to comment on, meaning this clamshell monitor design won’t turn heads for fast-paced gaming aficionados. Another difference between FHD and QHD models will come when the stretch lens mentioned in the intro comes into effect. If you want 10-point touch functionality on the bottom panel, you’ll need to choose the QHD model (Geminos X) and add $50 to your order.

As for pricing, at the time of writing the Geminos is still listed for early birds at $499, while the Geminos X is $649. These are both claimed to be half future retail prices.

Remember that participating and committing your money to a crowdfunder is not the same as buying a product from an online store. Sometimes projects go wrong and some people lose their money. Early adopters, on the other hand, get these innovative products first, and sometimes get great discounts off the mainstream introductory MSRPs.

If you like the idea of ​​having twin monitors on top of each other, but the bending and stitching aren’t your thing, please check out our recent review of the LG DualUp 28MQ780 monitor, which equals two stacked 21-inch QHD monitors. on top of each other.

Edward N. Arrington